The LA Lacrosse Leagues mission is to help teach life lessons to school aged children throughout Southern California via lacrosse and to promote and advance amateur youth lacrosse in a safe and sportsmanlike manner and to create a culture where leaders, c
 
 
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MEN'S LACROSSE

Men's Participation - Professional

  1. Major League Lacrosse, an outdoor professional league, debuted in 2001 with six teams located along the East Coast. The same six franchises return for the 2002 season.
  2. The National Lacrosse League dates back to the mid-1980s. Thirteen teams from the U.S. and Canada competed in the indoor league in 2001-02.

Men's Participation - College and University

  1. Nearly 25,000 men play lacrosse at over 400 colleges and universities which currently have lacrosse programs that are sanctioned either by the athletic department or the club sports department.
  2. 210 participating NCAA Division I, II and III universities and colleges compete for national championships.
  3. 24 NJCAA (National Junior College Athletic Association) teams compete for national championships.
  4. Over 200 participating NCAA Division I and III universities and colleges are building towards varsity programs by offering structured intercollegiate "club" programs.
  5. The average program has 45 to 50 players.
  6. The NCAA-sponsored men's lacrosse championship tournaments have consistently been in the top five of national attendance for collegiate championships.

Men's Participation - High School

  1. More than 72,000 men play lacrosse at 1,600 high schools, which currently sponsor programs that are either sanctioned by the athletic department or recognized as school affiliated club teams.
  2. Lacrosse programs began in eastern preparatory schools and have expanded to public and parochial schools nationwide. Since January 2000 alone, four states (California, Georgia, Illinois and Minnesota) have sanctioned lacrosse. The NFHS reported 74,225 male and female students played in 2001, a 20 percent increase from 2000 and better than a 100 percent increase since 1995.
  3. More than 1,250 high schools sponsor varsity programs.
  4. Over 350 high schools are building towards varsity program by offering structured interscholastic "club" programs.
  5. More than 600 schools have junior varsity and freshman programs.
  6. The average program consists of 35-40 players.

WOMEN'S LACROSSE

Women's Participation - College and University

  1. Over 5,500 women participate in lacrosse programs at 240 colleges and universities, sanctioned either by the athletic department or the club sports department.
  2. 248 participating NCAA Division I, II and III universities and college teams compete for the national championships.
  3. Over 50 participating NCAA Division I, II and III universities and colleges are building towards varsity programs offering structured intercollegiate "club" programs.
  4. The average program has 20-25 players.

Women's Participation - High School

  1. Over 15,000 women participate in lacrosse at 600 high schools which currently sponsor programs that are either sanctioned by the athletic department or are recognized as school affiliated club teams.
  2. Lacrosse programs began in eastern preparatory schools and have expanded to public and parochial schools nationwide. Since January 2000 alone, four states (California, Georgia, Illinois and Minnesota) have sanctioned lacrosse. The NFHS reported 74,225 male and female students played in 2001, a 20 percent increase from 2000 and better than a 100 percent increase since 1995.
  3. More than 450 high schools sponsor varsity programs.
  4. Approximately 150 high schools are building towards varsity by offering structured interscholastic "club" programs.
  5. More than 125 schools have junior varsity and freshman programs.
  6. The average team consists of 20-25 players.

YOUTH, CLUBS AND CAMPS

Club Participation - Men and Women

  1. There are over 11,500 players (7,500 men and 4,000 women) nationally playing lacrosse on over 300 men's and women's post-collegiate club teams in virtually every state in the country.
  2. Players at the club level are of the highest caliber.
  3. Professional profiles include lawyers, doctors, business executives, and other high earning power vocations.
  4. The average club organization has 35 to 40 players.
  5. Participants range in age from 18 to 60.

Youth Participation - Boys and Girls

  1. Youth and recreational programs playing both field and "soft" lacrosse are estimated at about 125,000 participants. US Lacrosse's 48 regional chapters indicated a total of 82,448 players participating in lacrosse at the youth level. Several areas of the country have youth programs but are not yet represented by a US Lacrosse chapter.
  2. Over 4,500 programs span the United States.
  3. Programs range in size from 50 to 15,000 children.
  4. Players range from 5 to 15 years of age.

Camps and Clinics - Boys and Girls

  1. Participants are primarily high school and youth players.
  2. These programs are staffed by current college and high school coaches.
  3. There are more than 300 men's and women's camps nationally.
  4. The majority of camps are held during the summer months.

MARKET DEMOGRAPHICS

  • 44 percent of all current players are under 14 years of age.
  • 36 percent are of or between the ages of 14 and 17 years.
  • 14 percent are of or between the ages of 18 and 22 years.
  • 4 percent are of or between the ages of 23 and 30 years.
  • 2 percent of all current players are over 30 years.
  • Youth players comprise better than 67 percent of US Lacrosse membership. High school players represent 15 percent, followed by adult players (6 percent), coaches (6 percent), officials (2 percent), and cross participants and miscellaneous.
  • Nearly 75 percent of all lacrosse fans/players have an annual household income of $50,000 or more.
  • Nearly 50 percent of all lacrosse fans/players estimate the current market value of their house and land to be $200,000 or more.
  • 19 percent of all lacrosse fans have investments of an approximate value of $300,000 or more.

INTERCROSSE
Developed more than a decade ago as an introductory, non-contact version of the sport, intercrosse is played in every state of the country and in approximately 39 other countries around the world by both men and women. The International InterCrosse Federation, based in Quebec, was formed in 1986 to promote intercrosse and coordinate regular international competition.

Over 500,000 individuals play intercrosse in the US Intercrosse is played in elementary, junior high school and high school physical education programs.

Intercrosse is also played as part of the physical education curriculum of recreational youth leagues and summer camps.

PROFESSIONAL LACROSSE

In 1999, Major League Lacrosse announced plans to create a professional field lacrosse league in 2001 owned by our sponsor, Jake Steinfeld. The MLL had a six-city summer all-star tour in 2000. Long Island won the inaugural MLL championship in 2001, defeating Baltimore in the championship game on Labor Day Weekend. Baltimore won the championship in 2002 before losing to Long Island in the 2003 title game. Franchises are located in: Baltimore, Boston, Long Island, New Jersey, Philadelphia and Rochester.

In November of 1986, the National Lacrosse League was formed as a viable professional indoor lacrosse league. Indoor lacrosse, often referred to as "box" lacrosse, is played under a completely different set of rules than field lacrosse. Consequently, the game's rules allow a much higher degree of physical contact than field lacrosse. The league has recently expanded out west to Arizona, Colorado and California. In 2004 10 teams played in the NLL: Anaheim Storm, Arizona Sting, Buffalo Bandits, Calgary Roughnecks, Colorado Mammoth, Philadelphia Wings, Rochester Knighthawks, San Jose Stealth, Toronto Rock, Vancouver Ravens. The indoor season runs from January to April, and games draw 5,000-18,000 spectators per game. Compensation for players averages between $5,000 and $10,000 per season. The 2004 All-Star Game held in Denver before 16,742 people. Denver set a record for five consecutive sell-outs in 2004 playing before 18,000 + per game.

SPECTATORS
The 2003 NCAA Division I men's lacrosse championship crowd of 37,944 at Baltimore's M&T Bank Stadium set a record for the largest crowd to ever attend a NCAA outdoor championship. Only men's basketball has drawn more spectators for a NCAA championship contest.

The 2002 college season included a Johns Hopkins-Navy men's game that drew 15,271 fans to Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium. It was the third-largest regular season crowd in the history of men's college lacrosse.

Fan attendance has nearly tripled in the last 10 years, with over 100,000 lacrosse enthusiasts attending the Men's NCAA Division I, II and III Lacrosse Championship tournaments in 1999.

The 1996 Men's Division III championship attendance of 18,555 set an all-time record for any Division III Championship.

The 1999 Mass Bay Jamboree in Massachusetts attracted more than 9,000 fans and 1,400 youth players over two days.

 

This information has been provided by US Lacrosse:

http://www.uslacrosse.org/the_sport/index.phtml